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NBA Finals Bucks take the title Follow reaction and live updates

NBA Finals  Bucks take the title Follow reaction and live updates

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NBA Finals Bucks take the title Follow reaction and live updates

Grand Finale: ESPN Director Jimmy Moore Ending His Historic Run … Tue, 20 Jul 2021 17:00:00 -0700-Follow the latest scores and news from the NBA Finals, as the Milwaukee Bucks take on the Phoenix Suns.

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NBA Finals: Bucks take the title. Follow reaction and live updates

NBA Finals: Bucks take the title. Follow reaction and live updates

Follow the latest scores and news from the NBA Finals, as the Milwaukee Bucks face the Phoenix Suns.

— It’s the first time since 1998 that the finals will be played without LeBron James, Stephen Curry, Kobe Bryant, Tim Duncan or Dwyane Wade.— It’s the first time since 1983 that nobody in the NBA Finals has been, or will be, a teammate of Shaquille O’Neal. You read that correctly. Every title series from 1984 through 2020 featured at least one player who had been (or would eventually be) teammates with O’Neal, a list that includes names like Greg Kite, John Salley, Byron Scott, Steve Kerr, Leandro Barbosa, Danny Green and Matt Barnes (along with everyone he played with on the 1995 Orlando Magic, 2000, 2001, 2002 and 2004 Los Angeles Lakers teams, and the 2006 Miami Heat). Though there is one technicality at play here: Phoenix guard Chris Paul and O’Neal were All-Star Game teammates.— Of the 12 referees working this series, three are in the NBA Finals for the first time. Courtney Kirkland, James Williams and Sean Wright are all set to make their finals debuts, though Wright was an alternate for the 2019 finals. David Goldman
Phoenix guard Chris Paul is in his 16th NBA season. This is his first finals.It is a historic wait.He has played in 123 playoff games without ever reaching the finals, the third-most in NBA history behind Paul Millsap (129) and Al Horford (124).And he could join a very small club. Only five players have won their first championship in their 16th season or later; Juwan Howard and Kevin Willis won championships in their 18th seasons (not counting the 1988-89 season that Willis missed), Jason Kidd got the elusive ring in his 17th season, and Dwight Howard and Gary Payton finally got their hands on the Larry O’Brien Trophy in their 16th seasons. Mark J. Terrill
Tuesday will mark the first time that an NBA Finals game has been played in July — which becomes the seventh month in which a title-round matchup will occur.Other months that have seen finals games: March, April, May, June, September, and October. Marcio Jose Sanchez
Giannis Antetokounmpo averaged 40 points on 60% shooting in Milwaukee’s two games against Phoenix this season. No player had averaged that, and shot that well, against the Suns in a single regular season since 1992-93 — when Chicago’s Michael Jordan averaged 42 points on 60.3% shooting.The Bulls ended up playing the Suns in that season’s finals, too. Morry Gash
Milwaukee won the Central Division and Phoenix won the Pacific Division this season.That means this will be the 10th consecutive season where a division champion will win the NBA title. The last division non-winner to end up as NBA champions was Dallas in 2011. Every team that made the finals since did so after winning a division crown. John Bazemore
NBA Finals games typically start late; most in this series will tip off shortly after 9 p.m. in the Eastern time zone, so they tend to finish around 11:30 p.m.History says the Suns might go a bit later.There have been two triple-overtime games in NBA Finals history — and Phoenix has played in both. They lost to Boston 128-126 on June 4, 1976, and defeated Chicago 129-121 on June 13, 1993.The NBA has also seen three double-overtime finals games. Milwaukee played in one of those, beating Boston 102-101 on May 10, 1974. Mark J. Terrill
A good omen for Milwaukee, perhaps?Since the NBA went to the current playoff format in 1984, there have been three instances of a No. 3 seed from one conference taking on the No. 2 seed from the other conference in the NBA Finals. (This will be the fourth; Milwaukee was seeded No. 3 in the East, Phoenix No. 2 in the West.)In all three of the previous 3-versus-2 finals matchups, the No. 3 seed won the NBA title: Detroit over the Los Angeles Lakers in 2004, San Antonio over Cleveland in 2007 and Dallas over Miami in 2011. Aaron Gash
Jrue Holiday doesn’t know what it’s like to play in the NBA Finals. Same goes for Giannis Antetokounmpo and Thanasis Antetokounmpo. In fact, no player in this series — except for Phoenix’s Jae Crowder — has logged a single second in a finals game.The Holiday and Antetokounmpo families have a bit of experience in this area, though.Justin Holiday, Jrue’s brother, played in a game with Golden State during the 2015 finals. And Kostas Antetokounmpo — Giannis’ and Thanasis’ brother — won a ring with the Lakers last season but didn’t play in the title series against Miami. Kathy Willens
One key for both teams in these NBA Finals: Don’t let the other team get a double-digit lead.Milwaukee and Phoenix have been pretty much unbeatable in these playoffs when either club gets a lead of at least 10 points. The Suns are 11-0 in the playoffs in games where they’ve had a double-digit lead; the Bucks are 10-1, the loss coming when they let a 17-point lead get away against Brooklyn in the Eastern Conference semifinals.In the regular season, Milwaukee was 41-9 in games in which it led by at least 10 at some point; Phoenix was 45-10 in such games.Phoenix’s biggest comeback win this season was 16 points, done twice, including once against Milwaukee. The biggest Bucks comeback win was a game in which they trailed by 19 against Philadelphia. Aaron Gash
If the Suns lead this series at any time, the franchise will have a winning postseason record again for the first time since May 18, 1995 — when they were 86-85 in their all-time playoff history.The Suns enter these finals 145-145 in postseason play.The Bucks haven’t had a winning postseason record since May 26, 2001, when they were 96-95. At the end of the 1980 playoffs, when they were 85-84. They’re 138-145 all-time in playoff action, meaning they can’t get over the .500 mark again in this series. Matt York

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Follow the latest scores and news from the NBA Finals, as the Milwaukee Bucks face the Phoenix Suns.

— It’s the first time since 1998 that the finals will be played without LeBron James, Stephen Curry, Kobe Bryant, Tim Duncan or Dwyane Wade.— It’s the first time since 1983 that nobody in the NBA Finals has been, or will be, a teammate of Shaquille O’Neal. You read that correctly. Every title series from 1984 through 2020 featured at least one player who had been (or would eventually be) teammates with O’Neal, a list that includes names like Greg Kite, John Salley, Byron Scott, Steve Kerr, Leandro Barbosa, Danny Green and Matt Barnes (along with everyone he played with on the 1995 Orlando Magic, 2000, 2001, 2002 and 2004 Los Angeles Lakers teams, and the 2006 Miami Heat). Though there is one technicality at play here: Phoenix guard Chris Paul and O’Neal were All-Star Game teammates.— Of the 12 referees working this series, three are in the NBA Finals for the first time. Courtney Kirkland, James Williams and Sean Wright are all set to make their finals debuts, though Wright was an alternate for the 2019 finals. David Goldman
Phoenix guard Chris Paul is in his 16th NBA season. This is his first finals.It is a historic wait.He has played in 123 playoff games without ever reaching the finals, the third-most in NBA history behind Paul Millsap (129) and Al Horford (124).And he could join a very small club. Only five players have won their first championship in their 16th season or later; Juwan Howard and Kevin Willis won championships in their 18th seasons (not counting the 1988-89 season that Willis missed), Jason Kidd got the elusive ring in his 17th season, and Dwight Howard and Gary Payton finally got their hands on the Larry O’Brien Trophy in their 16th seasons. Mark J. Terrill
Tuesday will mark the first time that an NBA Finals game has been played in July — which becomes the seventh month in which a title-round matchup will occur.Other months that have seen finals games: March, April, May, June, September, and October. Marcio Jose Sanchez
Giannis Antetokounmpo averaged 40 points on 60% shooting in Milwaukee’s two games against Phoenix this season. No player had averaged that, and shot that well, against the Suns in a single regular season since 1992-93 — when Chicago’s Michael Jordan averaged 42 points on 60.3% shooting.The Bulls ended up playing the Suns in that season’s finals, too. Morry Gash
Milwaukee won the Central Division and Phoenix won the Pacific Division this season.That means this will be the 10th consecutive season where a division champion will win the NBA title. The last division non-winner to end up as NBA champions was Dallas in 2011. Every team that made the finals since did so after winning a division crown. John Bazemore
NBA Finals games typically start late; most in this series will tip off shortly after 9 p.m. in the Eastern time zone, so they tend to finish around 11:30 p.m.History says the Suns might go a bit later.There have been two triple-overtime games in NBA Finals history — and Phoenix has played in both. They lost to Boston 128-126 on June 4, 1976, and defeated Chicago 129-121 on June 13, 1993.The NBA has also seen three double-overtime finals games. Milwaukee played in one of those, beating Boston 102-101 on May 10, 1974. Mark J. Terrill
A good omen for Milwaukee, perhaps?Since the NBA went to the current playoff format in 1984, there have been three instances of a No. 3 seed from one conference taking on the No. 2 seed from the other conference in the NBA Finals. (This will be the fourth; Milwaukee was seeded No. 3 in the East, Phoenix No. 2 in the West.)In all three of the previous 3-versus-2 finals matchups, the No. 3 seed won the NBA title: Detroit over the Los Angeles Lakers in 2004, San Antonio over Cleveland in 2007 and Dallas over Miami in 2011. Aaron Gash
Jrue Holiday doesn’t know what it’s like to play in the NBA Finals. Same goes for Giannis Antetokounmpo and Thanasis Antetokounmpo. In fact, no player in this series — except for Phoenix’s Jae Crowder — has logged a single second in a finals game.The Holiday and Antetokounmpo families have a bit of experience in this area, though.Justin Holiday, Jrue’s brother, played in a game with Golden State during the 2015 finals. And Kostas Antetokounmpo — Giannis’ and Thanasis’ brother — won a ring with the Lakers last season but didn’t play in the title series against Miami. Kathy Willens
One key for both teams in these NBA Finals: Don’t let the other team get a double-digit lead.Milwaukee and Phoenix have been pretty much unbeatable in these playoffs when either club gets a lead of at least 10 points. The Suns are 11-0 in the playoffs in games where they’ve had a double-digit lead; the Bucks are 10-1, the loss coming when they let a 17-point lead get away against Brooklyn in the Eastern Conference semifinals.In the regular season, Milwaukee was 41-9 in games in which it led by at least 10 at some point; Phoenix was 45-10 in such games.Phoenix’s biggest comeback win this season was 16 points, done twice, including once against Milwaukee. The biggest Bucks comeback win was a game in which they trailed by 19 against Philadelphia. Aaron Gash
If the Suns lead this series at any time, the franchise will have a winning postseason record again for the first time since May 18, 1995 — when they were 86-85 in their all-time playoff history.The Suns enter these finals 145-145 in postseason play.The Bucks haven’t had a winning postseason record since May 26, 2001, when they were 96-95. At the end of the 1980 playoffs, when they were 85-84. They’re 138-145 all-time in playoff action, meaning they can’t get over the .500 mark again in this series. Matt York

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NBA Finals: Bucks take the title. Follow reaction and live updates Tue, 20 Jul 2021 17:00:00 -0700-When ESPN's Jimmy Moore signs off from his 15th NBA Finals on ABC, the game he directed will have aired on the same ABC affiliate where he started his career …

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Grand Finale: ESPN Director Jimmy Moore Ending His Historic Run Of NBA Finals

July 20, 2021

imageLongtime ESPN director Jimmy Moore is running point on his 15th consecutive NBA Finals. (Jimmy Moore/ESPN)
Moore on working in the NBA bubble in 2020: “We are a family and are even more because of that.” (Phil Ellsworth/ESPN)
Moore started his television career at the ABC affiliate in Jackson, Miss., WAPT. (Photo courtesy WAPT/ESPN)
Senior coordinating producer Tim Corrigan (L) and Moore prior to Game 2 of the 2020 NBA Finals. (Phil Ellsworth / ESPN Images)

When ESPN’s Jimmy Moore signs off from his 15th NBA Finals on ABC, the game he directed will have aired on the same ABC affiliate where he started his career at 16 years old, in Jackson, Miss.

Throughout his days of working in television and at ESPN, Moore says, he’s always loved going to work.

This week, he closes out an ESPN career that began in 1982 and spans various historic moments across entities, including the NFL and MLB. He’s been a fixture of ESPN’s NBA coverage since the 2002-2003 season. Before the host Milwaukee Bucks vie to clinch the best-of-seven series against the Phoenix Suns tonight in Game 6 (9 ET, ABC), Moore looks back at directing 15 years of NBA Finals coverage and credits his team and the support of his wife, Beth.

Moore’s wife Beth constructed this collage of his event credentials. (Jimmy Moore/ESPN)

What stands out from your first NBA Finals in 2007?
Looking back, it’s really that it was [then Cleveland Cavaliers star] LeBron James’ first Finals. So we both entered this stage at the same time, which was kind of cool.

At the end of that, I remember [former San Antonio Spurs star Tim] Duncan whispering to him, “Hey, you’re gonna be the big player on this stage, welcome.” I feel like LeBron was there; I’ve documented LeBron for the last 15 years.

How would you describe your years of working the NBA Finals?
The number one thing is the people through the years. And the partnership with the league. It’s the best memory, the best feeling when everyone is pulling together. That’s my number one memory overall—the togetherness, the camaraderie of pulling this off together every year. The support of my family, too . . . I couldn’t do this without the support of my wife, Beth.

What I get is the opportunity to work with professionals that make my job easier. When you love what you do, and they love what they do, it’s great. I’ve still got a passion for it. I’m leaving, but I’ve got a passion for it, and I don’t want that ever to go away.

Something I’m really proud of over my 15 years of doing this is [working in the NBA bubble]. The bubble was incredible. The camaraderie and cooperation of men and women away from their families; we are a family and are even more because of that.

ESPN was great about understanding what it took to be there. At the end of that run, it was high fives, and “we pulled this off!” If you’re looking at this over 15 years, the bubble was huge; it’s got to be one of the top memories and accomplishments.

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Moore

Would you say the people are the most fulfilling part of your role?
One hundred percent. That and a job well done. It’s a bit of a cliché; I love the fact that I’m proud of the job we do. I think we do a good job and I like that we do it together. Our people make it work and I am just lucky enough to guide that ship.

Tim Corrigan [ESPN senior coordinating producer] and I have done 14 of these together. He’s great support. We’re a pretty good team and I like the way we complement each other. I’ve been very lucky with that.

Plus, the adrenaline rush of doing the game – to sit there and know everything you see at home is [the result of] me making a decision on the spot, right now. It doesn’t go on unless I make the call. There’s a rush to that.

How did you get into the television industry?
I’ve been doing this since I was 16, at an ABC affiliate. It’s kind of cool that at Game 7, hopefully, when we sign off, that will be signed off on that same ABC affiliate at home where I started, at the station my dad built in Jackson, Miss [WAPT Channel 16].

How do you feel during historic NBA Finals moments?
In the Finals, there have been moments that have been huge. We covered LeBron for eight consecutive Finals. That’s incredible on his part, but we were there for the ride. He had the block on [then-Golden State Warriors star Andre] Iguodala in 2016 [see below].

It’s one of those moments that you look at and [realize] we covered it really well. But, again, the crew is so good; that’s what they do.

In 2008 when Boston won and [Celtics center] Kevin Garnett yelled, “Anything is possible!” That gets you.

Another is 2016, LeBron yelling, “Cleveland, this is for you!” And then, [then Miami Heat guard] Ray Allen’s shot in the corner in 2013 [see below].

The number one goal is to document the event on the court properly. Our fans on ESPN want to see the game. So, are we giving it to them? I want to say yes.

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– July 21, 2021
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