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Eid ul Adha 2021 Eid AlAdha 2021 When is it how is it celebrated and how to wish

Eid ul Adha 2021 Eid AlAdha 2021 When is it how is it celebrated and how to wish
Eid, when is eid


Eid ul Adha 2021 – how will it be celebrated now that Covid … Mon, 19 Jul 2021 11:00:00 +0100-During the festival of Eid al-Adha, Muslims acknowledge the devotion of Ibrahim, who was willing to sacrifice his son, Ismail, under the order of Allah SWT (God).

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When is Eid al-Adha and how is it celebrated?

July 19, 2021

The second significant religious festival of Islam, Eid al-Adha, will begin on the evening of Monday, 19 July this year.

The first of the two observances is Eid al-Fitr, which was observed in May to mark the end of the holy month of Ramadan.

“Eid al-Adha is one of two Eids, or days of celebration for Muslims worldwide, in a year,” a spokesperson for the Muslim Council of Britain tells The Independent.

They explain that the festival coincides with the completion of Hajj, “which millions of people partake in every year”.

However, in light of the coronavirus pandemic, Hajj commenced much fewer pilgrims than the usual 2.5 million people who usually attend. This year, just 60,000 of Saudia Araba’s own citizens and residents have been allowed to take part.

Known as the “festival of sacrifice”, Eid al-Adha commemorates the prophet Ibrahim’s readiness to sacrifice his son in order to demonstrate his dedication to God.

Here is everything you need to know about Eid al-Adha:

During the festival of Eid al-Adha, Muslims acknowledge the devotion of Ibrahim, who was willing to sacrifice his son, Ismail, under the order of Allah SWT (God).

Ibrahim, also known as Abraham, is a prominent figure in Islam, Judaism and Christianity.

“This story in different versions is in the Quran, the Bible, and the Old Testament, which shows the common heritage of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam,” states the United Religions Initiative.

According to the Quran – the sacred religious book of Islam – just as Ibrahim was about to sacrifice his son, God replaced Ismail with a lamb, which was sacrificed instead.

“This command from Allah SWT was a test of Prophet Ibrahim’s willingness and commitment to obey his Lord’s command, without question. Therefore, Eid al-Adha means the festival of sacrifice,” states UK-based charity Muslim Aid.

Eid al-Adha and Eid-al-Fitr are the two major religious festivals observed in the religion of Islam.

Eid al-Fitr, which was celebrated in May in countries across the world, translates in Arabic to mean “the feast of the breaking of the fast”.

The festival marks the end of Ramadan, the Islamic holy month which involves Muslims fasting during daylight hours for 29 to 30 days.

Eid al-Adha coincides with Hajj, the annual Islamic pilgrimage to Mecca, in Saudi Arabia.

This year, Eid al-Adha begins on the evening of Monday 19 July and ends on the evening of Friday 23 July.

The Islamic calendar is a lunar calendar, meaning the dates of annual events may vary on an annual basis in accordance with the phases of the moon.

Eid al-Adha takes places on the 10th day of the final month of the Islamic calendar, Dhu al-Hijjah.

Dhu al-Hijjah is the 12th and most sacred month of the Islamic year, during which observant Muslims travel to Mecca for Hajj.

All able-bodied adults of the Islamic faith are expected to complete Hajj at least once in their lifetimes.

As Eid al-Adha commemorates the sacrifice made by the prophet Ibrahim, Muslims typically celebrate the festival by carrying out a Qurbani, meaning “sacrifice” in Arabic.

The animal that is sacrificed – which is usually a goat, sheep, cow or camel – is separated into three parts.

“At least one third of the meat from the animal must go to poor or vulnerable people,” states international aid organisation Islamic Relief.

“Traditionally, a Muslim would keep one third of the meat for their family and give the final third to their neighbours.”

During the morning of Eid al-Adha, a special prayer called Salat al-Eid is recited in honour of the festival, ahead of the Dhuhr prayer at noon.

Muslims traditionally dress in fine clothes in celebration of Eid al-Adha, in addition to exchanging gifts.

Eidi is the Arabic word for a gift given to children by relatives during Eid al-Adha and Eid al-Fitr.

While Eid al-Fitr is known as “sweet Eid”, Eid al-Adha is contrarily known as “salty Eid”.

As such, the food eaten during the second festival is predominantly savoury, including the animal which is sacrificed during the observance.

Arabian pastries called Ma’amoul are also eaten during both Eid festivals, as well as at night during the holy month of Ramadan.

Ma’amoul are made using ingredients including dates and nuts, and are often served in a ball or cookie shape.

The phrase widely used to wish someone a happy Eid during Eid al-Adha and Eid al-Fitr is Eid Mubarak.

In Arabic, this phrase translates to mean “Blessed Eid”.

The second significant religious festival of Islam, Eid al-Adha, will begin on the evening of Monday, 19 July this year.

The first of the two observances is Eid al-Fitr, which was observed in May to mark the end of the holy month of Ramadan.

“Eid al-Adha is one of two Eids, or days of celebration for Muslims worldwide, in a year,” a spokesperson for the Muslim Council of Britain tells The Independent.

They explain that the festival coincides with the completion of Hajj, “which millions of people partake in every year”.

However, in light of the coronavirus pandemic, Hajj commenced much fewer pilgrims than the usual 2.5 million people who usually attend. This year, just 60,000 of Saudia Araba’s own citizens and residents have been allowed to take part.

Known as the “festival of sacrifice”, Eid al-Adha commemorates the prophet Ibrahim’s readiness to sacrifice his son in order to demonstrate his dedication to God.

Here is everything you need to know about Eid al-Adha:

During the festival of Eid al-Adha, Muslims acknowledge the devotion of Ibrahim, who was willing to sacrifice his son, Ismail, under the order of Allah SWT (God).

Ibrahim, also known as Abraham, is a prominent figure in Islam, Judaism and Christianity.

“This story in different versions is in the Quran, the Bible, and the Old Testament, which shows the common heritage of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam,” states the United Religions Initiative.

According to the Quran – the sacred religious book of Islam – just as Ibrahim was about to sacrifice his son, God replaced Ismail with a lamb, which was sacrificed instead.

“This command from Allah SWT was a test of Prophet Ibrahim’s willingness and commitment to obey his Lord’s command, without question. Therefore, Eid al-Adha means the festival of sacrifice,” states UK-based charity Muslim Aid.

Eid al-Adha and Eid-al-Fitr are the two major religious festivals observed in the religion of Islam.

Eid al-Fitr, which was celebrated in May in countries across the world, translates in Arabic to mean “the feast of the breaking of the fast”.

The festival marks the end of Ramadan, the Islamic holy month which involves Muslims fasting during daylight hours for 29 to 30 days.

Eid al-Adha coincides with Hajj, the annual Islamic pilgrimage to Mecca, in Saudi Arabia.

This year, Eid al-Adha begins on the evening of Monday 19 July and ends on the evening of Friday 23 July.

The Islamic calendar is a lunar calendar, meaning the dates of annual events may vary on an annual basis in accordance with the phases of the moon.

Eid al-Adha takes places on the 10th day of the final month of the Islamic calendar, Dhu al-Hijjah.

Dhu al-Hijjah is the 12th and most sacred month of the Islamic year, during which observant Muslims travel to Mecca for Hajj.

All able-bodied adults of the Islamic faith are expected to complete Hajj at least once in their lifetimes.

As Eid al-Adha commemorates the sacrifice made by the prophet Ibrahim, Muslims typically celebrate the festival by carrying out a Qurbani, meaning “sacrifice” in Arabic.

The animal that is sacrificed – which is usually a goat, sheep, cow or camel – is separated into three parts.

“At least one third of the meat from the animal must go to poor or vulnerable people,” states international aid organisation Islamic Relief.

“Traditionally, a Muslim would keep one third of the meat for their family and give the final third to their neighbours.”

During the morning of Eid al-Adha, a special prayer called Salat al-Eid is recited in honour of the festival, ahead of the Dhuhr prayer at noon.

Muslims traditionally dress in fine clothes in celebration of Eid al-Adha, in addition to exchanging gifts.

Eidi is the Arabic word for a gift given to children by relatives during Eid al-Adha and Eid al-Fitr.

While Eid al-Fitr is known as “sweet Eid”, Eid al-Adha is contrarily known as “salty Eid”.

As such, the food eaten during the second festival is predominantly savoury, including the animal which is sacrificed during the observance.

Arabian pastries called Ma’amoul are also eaten during both Eid festivals, as well as at night during the holy month of Ramadan.

Ma’amoul are made using ingredients including dates and nuts, and are often served in a ball or cookie shape.

The phrase widely used to wish someone a happy Eid during Eid al-Adha and Eid al-Fitr is Eid Mubarak.

In Arabic, this phrase translates to mean “Blessed Eid”.


... read more

Eid Al-Adha 2021: When is it, how is it celebrated and how to wish … Mon, 19 Jul 2021 11:00:00 +0100-A 'breath of fresh air' for Muslim families who have not been able to celebrate together due to the pandemic.

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Eid ul Adha 2021 first in nearly two years with Covid rules

July 19, 2021

Muslims living in England will be able to celebrate Eid ul Adha without mandatory lockdown restrictions in place for the first time since 2019.

Due to Covid-19, celebrations that would usually include family gatherings have been restricted, leaving many unable to see loved ones.

In Leicester, the local lockdown meant families were separated for longer than in other parts of the country and Eid was just one of the many religious festivals celebrated in the city that was impacted by Covid-19.

Last year, Eid ul Adha plans had to be cancelled for many families at the last minute when fresh local travel and social restrictions were announced less than 24 hours before.

But as restrictions lift from today, Muslims can look forward to celebrating Eid tomorrow and Wednesday.

This year, Eid ul Adha will be celebrated on July 20 by most Muslims and on July 21 for some.

Eid ul Adha, which means the festival of sacrifice, coincides with the end of the Islamic pilgrimage, Hajj.

It commemorates the sacrifice which is believed to have been made by the prophet Ibrahim when he intended to sacrifice his son Ishamel to show obedience to God. After proving his obedience, Allah instead provided a lamb for the prophet Ibrahim to slaughter.

To mark Eid ul Adha, Muslim families donate money towards a sacrificial slaughter of a goat or cow, a portion of which is given to the vulnerable while others are given to and shared with family.

Unlike the last three occasions, including Eid Ul Fitr in May this year, families will be allowed to get together without having to limit numbers or social distance.

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Previous Eid celebrations in Victoria Park. They have been missed in Leicester. (Image: Leicester Mercury)

For those celebrating this week, the timing of Step 4 out of the lockdown has “worked out well”, said Suleman Nagdi, a spokesman for the Federation of Muslim Organisations in Leicester (FMO).

He told LeicestershireLive: “It's very exciting for people to be able to see their families and also pray in a congregation without restrictions – it will be a breath of fresh air.

“For many, it will possibly be a day of sadness as a lot of people have lost family members.”

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In the city, public prayer services in locals parks and an Eid Festival will go ahead after three, consecutive cancellations.

The Eid prayer will be performed in Spinney Hill Park tomorrow (July 20) at 9am.

Separately organised prayers, held in Victoria Park at the same time will also be followed by an Eid festival of family fun and food.

Suleman Nagdi added: “We wish Eid Mubarak to all those celebrating and our thoughts go out to those who lost loved ones in the pandemic.”


... read more
– July 19, 2021
Eid ul Adha 2021 Eid AlAdha 2021 When is it how is it celebrated and how to wish
Eid, when is eid

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