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News Covid PM set to confirm England unlocking for 19 July BBC

News Covid PM set to confirm England  unlocking for 19 July  BBC


COVID news live: Boris Johnson to hold press conference to reveal … Mon, 12 Jul 2021 11:00:00 +0100-Boris Johnson, who will hold a news conference in the afternoon, urges people to remain cautious.

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Covid: PM set to confirm England’s unlocking for 19 July – BBC News

  1. A short while ago we reported that congestion at Heathrow Airport had been caused by security guards having to self-isolate – and this has now been confirmed by the airport.

    A Heathrow spokesperson said: “Earlier today we experienced some passenger congestion in Terminal 5 departures, due to colleagues being instructed to self-isolate by NHS Test and Trace.

    “We have activated additional team members to assist passengers with their journeys and the operation has now returned to normal. We apologise to our passengers for any inconvenience caused.”

    The BBC understands more than 100 security guards were affected.

  2. Thousands of Cubans have joined the biggest protests for decades against the island's Communist government.

    They are marching in cities including the capital Havana, shouting, “Down with the dictatorship!”.

    Images on social media show what appear to be security forces detaining and beating some of the protesters.

    Cubans have been angered by the collapse of the economy, as well as by restrictions on civil liberties and the authorities' handling of the pandemic.

    The protesters are demanding a faster coronavirus vaccination programme after Cuba reported a record of nearly 7,000 daily infections and 47 deaths yesterday.

    Last year, Cuba's largely state-controlled economy shrank by 11%, its worst decline in almost three decades. It was hit hard by the pandemic and US sanctions.

  3. Your questions answered

    Getty ImagesCopyright: Getty Images

    Do you have questions about long Covid?

    Ahead of tonight's BBC Panorama on the condition, we'll be answering your questions here on the live page at 14:00 BST.

    Send in your questions to HaveYourSay@bbc.co.uk or tweet us @BBC_HaveYourSay

    We'll be putting your questions to:

    • Michelle Roberts, BBC News online health editor; and
    • Dr Lee Aiyegbusi, research fellow and deputy director of the Centre for Patient-Reported Outcomes Research at University of Birmingham
  4. image

    Caroline Davies

    BBC transport correspondent

    Congestion at Heathrow's Terminal 5 has been caused by more than 100 security guards receiving a notification from the NHS app forcing them into self-isolation, the BBC has been told.

    Some passengers complained on Twitterabout “total chaos” and posted pictures of large crowds at the terminal.

    A Heathrow spokesperson said: “We're currently experiencing some passenger congestion in Terminal 5 departures.

    “Our teams are working hard to get passengers away on their journeys and we hope to have the congestion cleared as quickly as possible. Passengers are reminded that face coverings are mandatory inside the airport.”

  5. ReutersCopyright: Reuters

    Shop staff are “scared” about customers not wearing face masks if coronavirus rules are relaxed, a Welsh union representative has said.

    Welsh ministers are still undecided if wearing masks will continue to be law in shops, while such Covid rules are due to be eased in England from next week.

    “Customers will just ignore the advice that is given in Wales and just do what they want,” said Tracey Davies from shop workers union Usdaw, based in Neath.

    “My staff are scared,” she told BBC Radio Wales Breakfast. “You take away the plastic screening in front of a checkout and their masks, they have no protection whatsoever.

    “It should continue to be made compulsory for shoppers to wear masks to protect the retail staff.”

    Read the full story.

  6. PA MediaCopyright: PA Media

    The UK's largest employers' body has urged the government to bring forward changes to Covid self-isolation rules.

    The CBI says it would ease firms' staff shortage problems and help ensure the next phase of lockdown reopening is a “confident” not “anxious” process.

    It wants clarity over continued workplace testing and says funding by government is also needed.

    Most Covid restrictions are due to end on 19 July. But planned changes to self-isolation rules are not expected until 16 August at the earliest.

    Many companies, especially in the hospitality and leisure sectors, say their 19 July reopening plans are in disarray due to the number of staff having to isolate because they have been “pinged” by the NHS app.

    The Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy says the government was working to reopen the economy while ensuring staff and customers are protected from the virus.

  7. PA MediaCopyright: PA Media

    Up to 1.5 million children in Britain face being left behind in their speaking and understanding due to disruption caused by Covid, research suggests.

    The communication charity, I CAN asked primary and secondary school teachers across England, Scotland, and Wales about the impact Covid 19 had had on their pupils.

    It found slightly over two-thirds (67%) of primary school teachers believe the children they teach are behind with their speaking and/or understanding.

    Almost two-thirds (60%) of secondary school teachers, who have pupils who are behind, were worried that these pupils would not be able to catch up.

    I CAN estimates this means up to 1.5 million children risk being left behind and suggests these children will find it hard to cope in secondary school without more help.

    The governments in England, Scotland and Wales are spending more than £3bn on plans to help pupils catch up.

    Read the full story.

  8. Lucy says she climbed mountains before Covid, but now tiny inclines leave her breathlessImage caption: Lucy says she climbed mountains before Covid, but now tiny inclines leave her breathless

    I’ve been a journalist for 22 years. I’ve written about foreign conflicts and tragedies in the UK, and I’ve covered the stories of thousands of people.

    I’ve tried to put myself in their shoes but in reality I realise now I haven’t. Not really.

    Last autumn I wrote a piece for the BBC News website about what it had been like being ill for seven months with long Covid.

    I wrote the article on my phone while lying in bed. It took me months.

    Hundreds of people got in touch as a result, and I was asked to make a BBC Panorama film about my experiences.

    I’ve covered the stories of people in chronic pain in the past, and found it's hard to show on camera what is ostensibly invisible.

    The answer was to film the impact on their lives. I’ve made tonight's programme to do just that.

    I’ve found being in the story myself incredibly uncomfortable. It is terrifying for me as a journalist to open my home and the details of my health to the camera.

    But I do so to try to explain how long Covid has affected me and my family.

    Read more of Lucy's story here.

    Watch Long Covid: Will I Ever Get Better? on BBC One and iPlayer (UK only) tonight at 19:35 BST

  9. Derbyshire's County Championship Group One game against Essex has been abandoned because of a positive Covid-19 test in the home squad.

    The decision was taken ahead of the second day's play in the cricket. Other members of the Derbyshire squad have been identified as close contacts and the players are now self-isolating.

    Confirmation about the points to be awarded from the game will be announced in due course.

    Read more here.

  10. Psychotherapist Becky Wright helped farmers with their mental health during the pandemicImage caption: Psychotherapist Becky Wright helped farmers with their mental health during the pandemic

    Local pandemic heroes are being honoured in a giant mural in a Somerset town.

    They include a woman who helped farmers with their mental health and a harpist who played 33 concerts to her neighbours in lockdown.

    A dozen portraits are being put up in Bridgwater in the coming weeks.

    Organiser Irena Hubble-Brezowski said: “They are just ordinary people who did what they thought was the right thing.”

    Read more here.

  11. ReutersCopyright: Reuters

    A further 31,772 confirmed coronavirus cases in the UK were announced by the government on Sunday – the fifth day that infections have been over 30,000.

    The rise in cases is being driven by the Delta variant, which spreads faster than the previously most common Kent variant (now named Alpha).

    Another 26 deaths within 28 days of a positive test were also reported.

    It comes as nearly 46 million people – 87% of all UK adults – have now received a first dose of a vaccine, with nearly 35 million people, or 66% of all adults, having had a second.

    England plans to end all legal restrictions on everyday life from 19 July – with Prime Minister Boris Johnson is set to confirm the changes in a press conference later.

    Read more on the statistics here and look up the situation where you live.

  12. image

    Today Programme

    BBC Radio 4

    Getty ImagesCopyright: Getty Images

    A scientist who advises the government on coronavirus says it is vital to keep some protective measures in place – such as wearing masks.

    Professor Peter Openshaw, a member of the New and Emerging Respiratory Virus Threats Advisory Group (Nervtag) told BBC Radio 4's Today programme: “I really don't see why people are reluctant to wear face coverings, it is quite clear that they do greatly reduce transmission.

    “Vaccines are fantastic but you have to give them time to work and in the meantime keeping up all those measures which we have learned to reduce the transmission is to me really vital.”

    When asked if face coverings should be mandatory he added: “I think it is very difficult to say that it is up to people to choose whether to wear face masks when it is not only protecting yourself but also protecting other people.

    “It's so much more straightforward to try to get face masks used in dangerous situations if there is some kind of compulsion behind it.”

    Should I still wear a face mask or covering and what are the rules?

  13. Dawn CavanaghCopyright: Dawn Cavanagh
    Dawn Cavanagh said lockdown severely impacted on her disabled son's mental healthImage caption: Dawn Cavanagh said lockdown severely impacted on her disabled son's mental health

    A mother has shared the anguish of going 15 weeks in the first lockdown without seeing her son who lives in residential care in Wales.

    Jack, 18, who has a learning disability, epilepsy, autism and ADHD, became anxious, depressed and started to self-harm, Dawn Cavanagh says.

    “He would sob down the phone, 'mummy come and get me',” she says.

    A report has found that many disabled people felt “abandoned” during the pandemic.

    The Welsh government has set up a taskforce to address the inequalities highlighted by the report.

    Mrs Cavanagh, who lives near Haverfordwest in Pembrokeshire, believes the importance of infection control came at the cost of human rights and the balance struck by the government was not right for disabled people.

  14. ReutersCopyright: Reuters

    Tokyo entered a new state of emergency today – less than two weeks before the start of the Olympic Games.

    The city recorded 502 new Covid cases on Sunday, the 23rd straight day of gains, amid a slow vaccination rollout.

    Organisers announced last week that spectators would be banned from nearly all venues after the spike in infections.

    Spectators from abroad had been banned months ago – but now residents are also being asked to follow the action on TV, rather than in person.

    Opinion polls have suggested the Japanese public is concerned about going ahead with the Games during the pandemic and there have been calls for them to be postponed or cancelled.

    The Games, postponed from last summer, start on 23 July and run until 8 August. Tokyo's state of emergency, the fourth in the capital, will last until 22 August, which is shortly before the Paralympics begin.

  15. image

    Today Programme

    BBC Radio 4

    Getty ImagesCopyright: Getty Images

    The amount of time between coronavirus jabs should not be shortened to less than eight weeks, Prof Adam Finn a member of the UK's Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation says.

    The committee recommended shortening the interval between jabs from 12 to eight weeks, amid a rising number of cases of the Delta variant

    But Prof Finn told BBC Radio 4's Today programme: “If you have a two-dose vaccine and you space the doses further apart, right the way up to something like six months, the response you get to the second dose is stronger.

    “And that’s because that gives your immune system more time to get itself primed up from the first dose and you get a bigger boost.”

    He says there's an advantage of getting people vaccinated with both doses as quickly as possible as cases climb because it gives greater protection.

    “But the downside is that boost is smaller and that will probably mean that the duration of protection you get from that second dose will be shorter,” he says.

    “There is a sweet spot,” he adds.

  16. ReutersCopyright: Reuters

    Thailand has decided to mix two vaccines in a bid to boost protection amid a spike in new infections.

    Instead of two shots of China's Sinovac vaccine, people will now receive AstraZeneca as their second dose.

    The move comes after hundreds of medical workers caught Covid despite being fully vaccinated with Sinovac.

    Health workers already fully vaccinated with Sinovac will also receive a third booster dose of either the AstraZeneca vaccine, or an mRNA vaccines like Pfizer/BioNTech.

    AstraZeneca is currently the only other vaccine available in the country, with Pfizer/BioNTech shots donated by the US set to arrive soon.

    Thailand is currently in the midst of a spike of new infections, reporting a record high of 9,418 on Sunday.

  17. image

    Owain Clarke

    BBC Wales Health Correspondent

    Getty ImagesCopyright: Getty Images

    Wales should now lift all Covid restrictions, a leading expert on infectious diseases has said.

    Prof John Watkins said the link between cases, hospitalisations and deaths had “definitely” been broken.

    The success of the vaccination programme and general immunity levels meant it was safe to end lockdown, said the Welsh and UK government advisor.

    The Welsh government will announce any changes to Covid rules at its next review on Wednesday.

    Latest data from Public Health Wales shows Covid case rates in Wales are at 127 cases per 100,000 people – below other UK nations and most English regions.

    The number of people admitted to hospital with Covid also remained close to record low levels, with the number of those in critical care also very low.

    Read more here.

  18. Getty ImagesCopyright: Getty Images

    We are expecting to hear later that the lifting of most Covid guidance and legal restrictions in England will go ahead on 19 July.

    The move will be confirmed during a press conference depending on a review of data.

    If the final stage of lockdown easing goes ahead in England it will mean there will be no limits on how many people can meet, the 1m-plus rule will be removed (except in some places like hospitals) and face coverings will no longer be required by law.

    You can find out what else could change here.

  19. Volunteers from St John Ambulance have given more than one million hours of their time to support the NHS since the start of the coronavirus pandemic.

    Watch below to find out more about how they have been helping in hospitals, providing emergency ambulance crews and helping with the vaccination rollout.

    Video caption: St John Ambulance has reached one million hours of service during the pandemic.St John Ambulance has reached one million hours of service during the pandemic.
  20. I am 44 years old and in my mind I'm a journalist, a mother, a wife, a cyclist, a mountain climber, a wild swimmer and an adventurer – just like I was 16 months ago.

    But in my body, I'm like someone twice my age.

    Most days I wake up in pain and go to bed with pain. I have vertigo, migraines and blurred vision. My joints feel like brittle bone grating on metal.

    I'm one of 385,000 people in the UK who have been suffering long Covid for more than 12 months – and that number is growing.

    We know that women are more likely to be affected than men and that many of the hundreds of thousands suffering the condition in the UK were previously young, fit and healthy.

    The latest figures from the ONSshow there are 962,000 people in the UK with multiple symptoms four weeks after initial infection.

    But what I really want to know is what it is and how to make it go away.

A short while ago we reported that congestion at Heathrow Airport had been caused by security guards having to self-isolate – and this has now been confirmed by the airport.

A Heathrow spokesperson said: “Earlier today we experienced some passenger congestion in Terminal 5 departures, due to colleagues being instructed to self-isolate by NHS Test and Trace.

“We have activated additional team members to assist passengers with their journeys and the operation has now returned to normal. We apologise to our passengers for any inconvenience caused.”

The BBC understands more than 100 security guards were affected.

Thousands of Cubans have joined the biggest protests for decades against the island's Communist government.

They are marching in cities including the capital Havana, shouting, “Down with the dictatorship!”.

Images on social media show what appear to be security forces detaining and beating some of the protesters.

Cubans have been angered by the collapse of the economy, as well as by restrictions on civil liberties and the authorities' handling of the pandemic.

The protesters are demanding a faster coronavirus vaccination programme after Cuba reported a record of nearly 7,000 daily infections and 47 deaths yesterday.

Last year, Cuba's largely state-controlled economy shrank by 11%, its worst decline in almost three decades. It was hit hard by the pandemic and US sanctions.

Your questions answered

Getty ImagesCopyright: Getty Images

Do you have questions about long Covid?

Ahead of tonight's BBC Panorama on the condition, we'll be answering your questions here on the live page at 14:00 BST.

Send in your questions to HaveYourSay@bbc.co.uk or tweet us @BBC_HaveYourSay

We'll be putting your questions to:

  • Michelle Roberts, BBC News online health editor; and
  • Dr Lee Aiyegbusi, research fellow and deputy director of the Centre for Patient-Reported Outcomes Research at University of Birmingham
image

Caroline Davies

BBC transport correspondent

Congestion at Heathrow's Terminal 5 has been caused by more than 100 security guards receiving a notification from the NHS app forcing them into self-isolation, the BBC has been told.

Some passengers complained on Twitterabout “total chaos” and posted pictures of large crowds at the terminal.

A Heathrow spokesperson said: “We're currently experiencing some passenger congestion in Terminal 5 departures.

“Our teams are working hard to get passengers away on their journeys and we hope to have the congestion cleared as quickly as possible. Passengers are reminded that face coverings are mandatory inside the airport.”

ReutersCopyright: Reuters

Shop staff are “scared” about customers not wearing face masks if coronavirus rules are relaxed, a Welsh union representative has said.

Welsh ministers are still undecided if wearing masks will continue to be law in shops, while such Covid rules are due to be eased in England from next week.

“Customers will just ignore the advice that is given in Wales and just do what they want,” said Tracey Davies from shop workers union Usdaw, based in Neath.

“My staff are scared,” she told BBC Radio Wales Breakfast. “You take away the plastic screening in front of a checkout and their masks, they have no protection whatsoever.

“It should continue to be made compulsory for shoppers to wear masks to protect the retail staff.”

Read the full story.

PA MediaCopyright: PA Media

The UK's largest employers' body has urged the government to bring forward changes to Covid self-isolation rules.

The CBI says it would ease firms' staff shortage problems and help ensure the next phase of lockdown reopening is a “confident” not “anxious” process.

It wants clarity over continued workplace testing and says funding by government is also needed.

Most Covid restrictions are due to end on 19 July. But planned changes to self-isolation rules are not expected until 16 August at the earliest.

Many companies, especially in the hospitality and leisure sectors, say their 19 July reopening plans are in disarray due to the number of staff having to isolate because they have been “pinged” by the NHS app.

The Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy says the government was working to reopen the economy while ensuring staff and customers are protected from the virus.

PA MediaCopyright: PA Media

Up to 1.5 million children in Britain face being left behind in their speaking and understanding due to disruption caused by Covid, research suggests.

The communication charity, I CAN asked primary and secondary school teachers across England, Scotland, and Wales about the impact Covid 19 had had on their pupils.

It found slightly over two-thirds (67%) of primary school teachers believe the children they teach are behind with their speaking and/or understanding.

Almost two-thirds (60%) of secondary school teachers, who have pupils who are behind, were worried that these pupils would not be able to catch up.

I CAN estimates this means up to 1.5 million children risk being left behind and suggests these children will find it hard to cope in secondary school without more help.

The governments in England, Scotland and Wales are spending more than £3bn on plans to help pupils catch up.

Read the full story.

Lucy says she climbed mountains before Covid, but now tiny inclines leave her breathlessImage caption: Lucy says she climbed mountains before Covid, but now tiny inclines leave her breathless

I’ve been a journalist for 22 years. I’ve written about foreign conflicts and tragedies in the UK, and I’ve covered the stories of thousands of people.

I’ve tried to put myself in their shoes but in reality I realise now I haven’t. Not really.

Last autumn I wrote a piece for the BBC News website about what it had been like being ill for seven months with long Covid.

I wrote the article on my phone while lying in bed. It took me months.

Hundreds of people got in touch as a result, and I was asked to make a BBC Panorama film about my experiences.

I’ve covered the stories of people in chronic pain in the past, and found it's hard to show on camera what is ostensibly invisible.

The answer was to film the impact on their lives. I’ve made tonight's programme to do just that.

I’ve found being in the story myself incredibly uncomfortable. It is terrifying for me as a journalist to open my home and the details of my health to the camera.

But I do so to try to explain how long Covid has affected me and my family.

Read more of Lucy's story here.

Watch Long Covid: Will I Ever Get Better? on BBC One and iPlayer (UK only) tonight at 19:35 BST

Derbyshire's County Championship Group One game against Essex has been abandoned because of a positive Covid-19 test in the home squad.

The decision was taken ahead of the second day's play in the cricket. Other members of the Derbyshire squad have been identified as close contacts and the players are now self-isolating.

Confirmation about the points to be awarded from the game will be announced in due course.

Read more here.

Psychotherapist Becky Wright helped farmers with their mental health during the pandemicImage caption: Psychotherapist Becky Wright helped farmers with their mental health during the pandemic

Local pandemic heroes are being honoured in a giant mural in a Somerset town.

They include a woman who helped farmers with their mental health and a harpist who played 33 concerts to her neighbours in lockdown.

A dozen portraits are being put up in Bridgwater in the coming weeks.

Organiser Irena Hubble-Brezowski said: “They are just ordinary people who did what they thought was the right thing.”

Read more here.

ReutersCopyright: Reuters

A further 31,772 confirmed coronavirus cases in the UK were announced by the government on Sunday – the fifth day that infections have been over 30,000.

The rise in cases is being driven by the Delta variant, which spreads faster than the previously most common Kent variant (now named Alpha).

Another 26 deaths within 28 days of a positive test were also reported.

It comes as nearly 46 million people – 87% of all UK adults – have now received a first dose of a vaccine, with nearly 35 million people, or 66% of all adults, having had a second.

England plans to end all legal restrictions on everyday life from 19 July – with Prime Minister Boris Johnson is set to confirm the changes in a press conference later.

Read more on the statistics here and look up the situation where you live.

image

Today Programme

BBC Radio 4

Getty ImagesCopyright: Getty Images

A scientist who advises the government on coronavirus says it is vital to keep some protective measures in place – such as wearing masks.

Professor Peter Openshaw, a member of the New and Emerging Respiratory Virus Threats Advisory Group (Nervtag) told BBC Radio 4's Today programme: “I really don't see why people are reluctant to wear face coverings, it is quite clear that they do greatly reduce transmission.

“Vaccines are fantastic but you have to give them time to work and in the meantime keeping up all those measures which we have learned to reduce the transmission is to me really vital.”

When asked if face coverings should be mandatory he added: “I think it is very difficult to say that it is up to people to choose whether to wear face masks when it is not only protecting yourself but also protecting other people.

“It's so much more straightforward to try to get face masks used in dangerous situations if there is some kind of compulsion behind it.”

Should I still wear a face mask or covering and what are the rules?

Dawn CavanaghCopyright: Dawn Cavanagh
Dawn Cavanagh said lockdown severely impacted on her disabled son's mental healthImage caption: Dawn Cavanagh said lockdown severely impacted on her disabled son's mental health

A mother has shared the anguish of going 15 weeks in the first lockdown without seeing her son who lives in residential care in Wales.

Jack, 18, who has a learning disability, epilepsy, autism and ADHD, became anxious, depressed and started to self-harm, Dawn Cavanagh says.

“He would sob down the phone, 'mummy come and get me',” she says.

A report has found that many disabled people felt “abandoned” during the pandemic.

The Welsh government has set up a taskforce to address the inequalities highlighted by the report.

Mrs Cavanagh, who lives near Haverfordwest in Pembrokeshire, believes the importance of infection control came at the cost of human rights and the balance struck by the government was not right for disabled people.

ReutersCopyright: Reuters

Tokyo entered a new state of emergency today – less than two weeks before the start of the Olympic Games.

The city recorded 502 new Covid cases on Sunday, the 23rd straight day of gains, amid a slow vaccination rollout.

Organisers announced last week that spectators would be banned from nearly all venues after the spike in infections.

Spectators from abroad had been banned months ago – but now residents are also being asked to follow the action on TV, rather than in person.

Opinion polls have suggested the Japanese public is concerned about going ahead with the Games during the pandemic and there have been calls for them to be postponed or cancelled.

The Games, postponed from last summer, start on 23 July and run until 8 August. Tokyo's state of emergency, the fourth in the capital, will last until 22 August, which is shortly before the Paralympics begin.

image

Today Programme

BBC Radio 4

Getty ImagesCopyright: Getty Images

The amount of time between coronavirus jabs should not be shortened to less than eight weeks, Prof Adam Finn a member of the UK's Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation says.

The committee recommended shortening the interval between jabs from 12 to eight weeks, amid a rising number of cases of the Delta variant

But Prof Finn told BBC Radio 4's Today programme: “If you have a two-dose vaccine and you space the doses further apart, right the way up to something like six months, the response you get to the second dose is stronger.

“And that’s because that gives your immune system more time to get itself primed up from the first dose and you get a bigger boost.”

He says there's an advantage of getting people vaccinated with both doses as quickly as possible as cases climb because it gives greater protection.

“But the downside is that boost is smaller and that will probably mean that the duration of protection you get from that second dose will be shorter,” he says.

“There is a sweet spot,” he adds.

ReutersCopyright: Reuters

Thailand has decided to mix two vaccines in a bid to boost protection amid a spike in new infections.

Instead of two shots of China's Sinovac vaccine, people will now receive AstraZeneca as their second dose.

The move comes after hundreds of medical workers caught Covid despite being fully vaccinated with Sinovac.

Health workers already fully vaccinated with Sinovac will also receive a third booster dose of either the AstraZeneca vaccine, or an mRNA vaccines like Pfizer/BioNTech.

AstraZeneca is currently the only other vaccine available in the country, with Pfizer/BioNTech shots donated by the US set to arrive soon.

Thailand is currently in the midst of a spike of new infections, reporting a record high of 9,418 on Sunday.

image

Owain Clarke

BBC Wales Health Correspondent

Getty ImagesCopyright: Getty Images

Wales should now lift all Covid restrictions, a leading expert on infectious diseases has said.

Prof John Watkins said the link between cases, hospitalisations and deaths had “definitely” been broken.

The success of the vaccination programme and general immunity levels meant it was safe to end lockdown, said the Welsh and UK government advisor.

The Welsh government will announce any changes to Covid rules at its next review on Wednesday.

Latest data from Public Health Wales shows Covid case rates in Wales are at 127 cases per 100,000 people – below other UK nations and most English regions.

The number of people admitted to hospital with Covid also remained close to record low levels, with the number of those in critical care also very low.

Read more here.

Getty ImagesCopyright: Getty Images

We are expecting to hear later that the lifting of most Covid guidance and legal restrictions in England will go ahead on 19 July.

The move will be confirmed during a press conference depending on a review of data.

If the final stage of lockdown easing goes ahead in England it will mean there will be no limits on how many people can meet, the 1m-plus rule will be removed (except in some places like hospitals) and face coverings will no longer be required by law.

You can find out what else could change here.

Volunteers from St John Ambulance have given more than one million hours of their time to support the NHS since the start of the coronavirus pandemic.

Watch below to find out more about how they have been helping in hospitals, providing emergency ambulance crews and helping with the vaccination rollout.

Video caption: St John Ambulance has reached one million hours of service during the pandemic.St John Ambulance has reached one million hours of service during the pandemic.

I am 44 years old and in my mind I'm a journalist, a mother, a wife, a cyclist, a mountain climber, a wild swimmer and an adventurer – just like I was 16 months ago.

But in my body, I'm like someone twice my age.

Most days I wake up in pain and go to bed with pain. I have vertigo, migraines and blurred vision. My joints feel like brittle bone grating on metal.

I'm one of 385,000 people in the UK who have been suffering long Covid for more than 12 months – and that number is growing.

We know that women are more likely to be affected than men and that many of the hundreds of thousands suffering the condition in the UK were previously young, fit and healthy.

The latest figures from the ONSshow there are 962,000 people in the UK with multiple symptoms four weeks after initial infection.

But what I really want to know is what it is and how to make it go away.


... read more

Covid: PM set to confirm England's unlocking for 19 July – BBC News Mon, 12 Jul 2021 11:00:00 +0100-Boris Johnson expected to say final stage of lockdown easing will go ahead on 19 July; five days of tests could replace self-isolation, vaccines minister says; …

image

COVID news live: Boris Johnson to hold press conference to reveal whether 19 July reopening will go ahead

Key points: 

  • Boris Johnson will reveal later whether the final stage of England's lockdown easing will go ahead on 19 July 
  • He'll host a press conference later – and is expected to push ahead with the plans 
  • Expert warns life will be 'massively disrupted' by people being told to self-isolate over the summer 
  • Five days of tests could replace self-isolation for the double jabbed, vaccines minister tells Sky News 
  • British Airways facing 'crew shortage' over summer – report 
  • COVID deaths rise by two-thirds over past week
  • Live reporting by Emily Mee


... read more
– July 12, 2021
News Covid PM set to confirm England unlocking for 19 July BBC

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