NewsUK

Amber list countries International travel from amber list countries and territories

Amber list countries International travel from amber list countries and territories


Covid-19: Amber list quarantine for fully vaccinated to end on 19 July Thu, 08 Jul 2021 12:00:00 +0100-The guidance on travel to and from amber list countries to England will change 19 July 2021.

image

International travel from amber list countries and territories

Thank you, Madame Deputy Speaker.

I do not underestimate for a second just how difficult the last 16 months have been for those who have not been able to travel to see their families, and for the travel, tourism and aviation sectors.

No minister – let alone a Transport Secretary – would ever want to curtail our freedom and ask people not to travel.

But protecting public health has rightly been, and will continue to be, our overriding priority of this government and that’s why we have introduced some of the toughest border measures in the world.

But we are now, thanks to our brilliant vaccination programme, in a position where we can start to think about how we live with coronavirus, while returning life to a sense of normality. Last week, I said at this dispatch box that the government intended to ease restrictions on fully vaccinated travellers returning from amber list countries.

Well, I am now pleased to be able to provide more detail. As one of the world’s most vaccinated countries, we must use these advantages to restore many of the freedoms that have been necessarily lost over recent months.

So I can confirm today that, from 19 July, UK residents who are fully vaccinated through the UK vaccine rollout will no longer have to self-isolate when they return to England.

They will still be required to take a test 3 days before returning, the pre-departure test, demonstrating they are negative before they travel and a PCR test on or before day 2, but they will no longer be required to take a day 8 test.

In essence this means that for fully vaccinated travellers the requirements for green and amber list countries are the same.

To be clear, a full vaccination means 14 days have passed since your final dose of the vaccine.

It is also important to note that health matters are devolved, so decision-making and implementation may differ across the UK’s administrations. We will continue to work with devolved administrations to ensure we achieve our shared objective of a safe, sustainable and robust return to international travel.

Madame Deputy Speaker, the change I am announcing today will prioritise those vaccinated in the UK. However, as I made clear last week, we want to welcome international visitors back to the UK and are working to extend our approach to vaccinated passengers from important markets and holiday destinations later this summer, such as the USA and the EU. I will update the House in due course on how we approach vaccinated individuals from other countries.

When I highlighted this potential policy to the House last week, I explained that we needed to take some additional time to look at how children and the evidence around children – who will not, of course, have been able to benefit from vaccines, will be treated.

I can tell the House today that children under 18 returning from amber list countries will not have to isolate on their return to the UK, nor take a day 8 test.

Children between ages 5 and 10 will only need to take a day 2 test. As before, children 4 and under will be exempt from all testing and isolation requirements.

I know this was a big concern of families, and after working with the scientists and public health experts, I am delighted to be able to offer that reassurance today.

The success of our vaccine programme has been aided by those selflessly creating the great benefits for society and for the rest of the world by being a part of those clinical trials, without which we wouldn’t have this vaccine programme. We committed to ensuring they are not disadvantaged as a result of being part of those trials, and I am delighted to announce that those on approved clinical trials in the UK will also not need to self-isolate or take a day 8 test on arrival from an amber-listed country.

Passengers will need to prove their vaccination status and they will do that either through the NHS COVID Pass available on the main NHS App – not the COVID app – or via the accessible letter, which can be obtained by calling 119 for those without access to smartphones.

Passengers returning to England will be asked to include their vaccination status on their passenger locator form, if they wish to benefit from the exemption to self-isolate.

Transport operators and carriers will be required to check a passenger’s proof of being fully vaccinated before they are able to get on the form of transport.

The government has been working closely with international partners on restarting international travel safely through certification.

I am pleased to announce to the House today that more than 30 countries and territories are now recognising vaccine certification as part of entry requirements, and either accepting the proof of vaccination letter or the NHS app itself, and we will continue to increase that number so that the NHS app becomes the natural default.

Passengers should, of course, check Foreign Office travel advice to understand the latest entry requirements and COVID-19 rules at their destination.

Madame Deputy Speaker, we know that travel is important and that many people have not been able to travel for the last year and a half.

This is not, of course, just about holidays, eager as we are I’m sure for time in the sun. This is also about reuniting families who have been apart throughout the pandemic. It is about helping businesses to trade and grow and it is about supporting our aviation sector which hundreds of thousands of jobs rely on.

An industry which this government has backed through £7 billion of support during this pandemic. As the industry tell me, the support is of course very welcome but the only way to recover the industry is to allow them to fly and for travel to resume again.

Which is why I am pleased to also announce today, that from the 19 July, we will remove the guidance that people should not travel to countries on the amber list. This means people will be able to travel for leisure, business or to see family to amber list countries.

I am sure the House will welcome this development in our approach to international travel. However, I want to be clear that as we begin to ease restrictions, travel will not be the same as it was before, in say 2019.

People should continue to check the Foreign Office travel advice, travel where possible outside busy weekend times and, importantly, they should expect that their experience at the border will of course be different because longer waiting times will be necessitated by risks as we introduce and expand the range of e-gates available to read the passenger locator forms.

I must make clear that public health remains our key priority and that is why we will not make any changes to the requirements applying to those arriving from countries on the red list – even where they are fully vaccinated.

The measures I have announced today have been designed in close cooperation with my Right Honourable Friend the Health Secretary, along with medical and scientific experts, to ensure we can continue to minimise the risk of new variants.

And, as many of us know from personal travel experience, the government will not hesitate to act if required and the data suggests that needs to happen. In other words, to put this on the record, an amber list country could still turn red, necessitating a change in behaviour when we return to the UK, and indeed if a country goes into red, mandatory hotel quarantine.

The UK has achieved many hard-won gains, through our successful vaccination programme, and through the continued spirit and determination of the British people. We continue to encourage people to take up the vaccine when offered not only to protect themselves but also to restore previous freedoms more safely.

19 July will mark the next step in the cautious reopening of international travel. Thanks to this government’s incredible success with the vaccine programme, people in England will be able to travel more easily, visit their family and friends who they have not seen for so long and also get business moving once again.

Kick starting our economy while keeping the UK safe and supporting a wide range of jobs and industries in the process.

Madame Deputy Speaker, I commend this statement to this House.

See also


... read more

International travel from amber list countries and territories Thu, 08 Jul 2021 12:00:00 +0100-The exemption will apply to vaccinated UK residents and under-18s arriving in England from 19 July.

image

Covid-19: Amber list quarantine for fully vaccinated to end on 19 July

By Hamish Mackay & Alex Kleiderman
BBC News

media captionGrant Shapps announces changes to quarantine rules for the fully vaccinated

Fully vaccinated UK residents arriving in England from amber travel list destinations will no longer have to quarantine from 19 July.

They will, however, still need to pay for Covid tests before and after their return, the transport secretary said.

Grant Shapps told MPs that under-18s returning from amber list places would also be exempt from quarantine.

Travel industry leaders said the change was a “positive step” but called for the amber list to be expanded.

Currently, anyone returning from amber or red list countries must isolate for 10 days, regardless of vaccine status.

Mr Shapps said a full vaccination means “14 days have passed since your final dose of the vaccine” – and only vaccines given by the NHS will count.

“In essence, this means that for fully vaccinated travellers the requirements for green and amber list countries are the same,” he added.

Both Scotland and Wales have said they will consider whether to follow the rule change.

It is understood the Stormont executive has agreed that double-jabbed travellers returning to Northern Ireland from amber countries will not need to isolate from 26 July.

Mr Shapps also said that, from 19 July – which is also the day when most Covid rules in England are due to end – the guidance that people should not travel to amber list countries will be removed.

But he cautioned that “an amber list country could still turn red”, meaning hotel quarantine would become a requirement.

All of England's 19 July rule changes are due to be confirmed on 12 July after a review of the latest data.

image captionHeathrow Airport welcomed the news, but called for the rules to be eased even further

The UK government's traffic light system for travel applies to England, with Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland able to make their own rules.

However, the rules are broadly the same and previous changes to the lists have been adopted by all four nations.

Fewer than 30 destinations are on the green list – meaning travellers do not have to self-isolate when they get back to the UK, while more than 50 countries are on the strictest red list, which requires arrivals to pay to self-isolate in a hotel for 10 days.

But most places – including several holiday hotspots such as mainland Spain, Greece and the US – are on the amber list, which – at present – requires people to quarantine for 10 days and pay for tests.

The next review of the countries on the green, red and amber lists will take place on 15 July.

For the first time in a while, travel bosses are relatively pleased.

Today's announcement is a big change, opening up international travel far more significantly that has been possible this year. However, there are limitations.

This policy only applies to those jabbed in the UK, meaning those jabbed abroad will still have to quarantine if coming from an amber list country.

That will affect some family and friends hoping to reunite and impact on businesses that rely on international visitors who won't see those customers return in the same numbers as UK travellers will leave.

Tests are still required from green and amber list countries. The cost will dissuade some from travelling.

Crucially, this rule is just about what happens when people travel to the UK. Whether other countries will let UK travellers in is a different matter altogether.

Tim Alderslade, chief executive of Airlines UK, the industry body representing UK-registered carriers, said the rule change was a “positive move towards the genuine reopening the sector has been looking for”.

And John Holland-Kaye, chief executive of Heathrow, said the change was “excellent news that will give a much-needed boost to millions of people across Britain looking forward to a more normal summer”.

“But the job isn't done,” he said, adding: “The UK should open up travel to fully vaccinated people from more countries – particularly our key partners in the US – by the end of July.”

However, MP Caroline Lucas – vice-chair of the All-Party Parliamentary Group on Coronavirus, said the government was “in danger of repeating the same mistakes that allowed the Delta variant to take root in the UK”.

“Dropping quarantine without… additional protections in place risks leaving the country dangerously exposed to new variants that could undo our hard-won progress against the virus,” she said.

The traffic light system sets the rules travellers must follow on their return. But holidaymakers also need to check their destination's entry rules.

For example, all non-vaccinated travellers to mainland Portugal need a negative Covid test, and must quarantine for 14 days. Twelve to 17-year-olds travelling with fully-vaccinated parents don't have to quarantine but need a negative test. Under-11s are exempt.

Only fully-vaccinated adults can travel to Malta, and do not need a negative test. Children aged 5-11 can travel with fully-vaccinated adults, but need a negative test. Under-5s don't need a test. Unvaccinated 12 to 17-year olds can't enter.

Over-12s travelling to Spain need a negative test or proof of vaccination.

Unvaccinated travellers can only enter France for “essential reasons”, and must self-isolate for seven days. Fully-vaccinated adults with a negative test can enter. Under-18s travelling with fully-vaccinated adults don't need to self-isolate.

Earlier, Chancellor Rishi Sunak told the BBC that in addition to relaxing the rules around isolation for travellers, the government was considering a “more proportionate and balanced approach” to isolation for Covid contacts.

It comes amid fears that surging cases across the UK will lead to millions of people being asked to self-isolate during the summer, even if they have been fully vaccinated.

The requirement for double-jabbed people to isolate after contact with a positive case is due to end on 16 August, four weeks after the majority of England's Covid rules are set to end.

The prime minister said the 16 August date was chosen to “get even more vaccinations into people's arms, give ourselves even more protection”.

A total of 32,551 new coronavirus cases were announced on Thursday – up very slightly on Wednesday – as well as 35 more deaths.

Nearly 65% of the adult population in the UK have received two jabs, and 86% have had a first dose.

Have you been affected by the issues raised in this story? Share your experiences and views by emailing haveyoursay@bbc.co.uk.

Please include a contact number if you are willing to speak to a BBC journalist. You can also get in touch in the following ways:

If you are reading this page and can't see the form you will need to visit the mobile version of the BBC website to submit your question or comment or you can email us at HaveYourSay@bbc.co.uk. Please include your name, age and location with any submission.

By Hamish Mackay & Alex Kleiderman
BBC News

media captionGrant Shapps announces changes to quarantine rules for the fully vaccinated

Fully vaccinated UK residents arriving in England from amber travel list destinations will no longer have to quarantine from 19 July.

They will, however, still need to pay for Covid tests before and after their return, the transport secretary said.

Grant Shapps told MPs that under-18s returning from amber list places would also be exempt from quarantine.

Travel industry leaders said the change was a “positive step” but called for the amber list to be expanded.

Currently, anyone returning from amber or red list countries must isolate for 10 days, regardless of vaccine status.

Mr Shapps said a full vaccination means “14 days have passed since your final dose of the vaccine” – and only vaccines given by the NHS will count.

“In essence, this means that for fully vaccinated travellers the requirements for green and amber list countries are the same,” he added.

Both Scotland and Wales have said they will consider whether to follow the rule change.

It is understood the Stormont executive has agreed that double-jabbed travellers returning to Northern Ireland from amber countries will not need to isolate from 26 July.

Mr Shapps also said that, from 19 July – which is also the day when most Covid rules in England are due to end – the guidance that people should not travel to amber list countries will be removed.

But he cautioned that “an amber list country could still turn red”, meaning hotel quarantine would become a requirement.

All of England's 19 July rule changes are due to be confirmed on 12 July after a review of the latest data.

image captionHeathrow Airport welcomed the news, but called for the rules to be eased even further

The UK government's traffic light system for travel applies to England, with Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland able to make their own rules.

However, the rules are broadly the same and previous changes to the lists have been adopted by all four nations.

Fewer than 30 destinations are on the green list – meaning travellers do not have to self-isolate when they get back to the UK, while more than 50 countries are on the strictest red list, which requires arrivals to pay to self-isolate in a hotel for 10 days.

But most places – including several holiday hotspots such as mainland Spain, Greece and the US – are on the amber list, which – at present – requires people to quarantine for 10 days and pay for tests.

The next review of the countries on the green, red and amber lists will take place on 15 July.

For the first time in a while, travel bosses are relatively pleased.

Today's announcement is a big change, opening up international travel far more significantly that has been possible this year. However, there are limitations.

This policy only applies to those jabbed in the UK, meaning those jabbed abroad will still have to quarantine if coming from an amber list country.

That will affect some family and friends hoping to reunite and impact on businesses that rely on international visitors who won't see those customers return in the same numbers as UK travellers will leave.

Tests are still required from green and amber list countries. The cost will dissuade some from travelling.

Crucially, this rule is just about what happens when people travel to the UK. Whether other countries will let UK travellers in is a different matter altogether.

Tim Alderslade, chief executive of Airlines UK, the industry body representing UK-registered carriers, said the rule change was a “positive move towards the genuine reopening the sector has been looking for”.

And John Holland-Kaye, chief executive of Heathrow, said the change was “excellent news that will give a much-needed boost to millions of people across Britain looking forward to a more normal summer”.

“But the job isn't done,” he said, adding: “The UK should open up travel to fully vaccinated people from more countries – particularly our key partners in the US – by the end of July.”

However, MP Caroline Lucas – vice-chair of the All-Party Parliamentary Group on Coronavirus, said the government was “in danger of repeating the same mistakes that allowed the Delta variant to take root in the UK”.

“Dropping quarantine without… additional protections in place risks leaving the country dangerously exposed to new variants that could undo our hard-won progress against the virus,” she said.

The traffic light system sets the rules travellers must follow on their return. But holidaymakers also need to check their destination's entry rules.

For example, all non-vaccinated travellers to mainland Portugal need a negative Covid test, and must quarantine for 14 days. Twelve to 17-year-olds travelling with fully-vaccinated parents don't have to quarantine but need a negative test. Under-11s are exempt.

Only fully-vaccinated adults can travel to Malta, and do not need a negative test. Children aged 5-11 can travel with fully-vaccinated adults, but need a negative test. Under-5s don't need a test. Unvaccinated 12 to 17-year olds can't enter.

Over-12s travelling to Spain need a negative test or proof of vaccination.

Unvaccinated travellers can only enter France for “essential reasons”, and must self-isolate for seven days. Fully-vaccinated adults with a negative test can enter. Under-18s travelling with fully-vaccinated adults don't need to self-isolate.

Earlier, Chancellor Rishi Sunak told the BBC that in addition to relaxing the rules around isolation for travellers, the government was considering a “more proportionate and balanced approach” to isolation for Covid contacts.

It comes amid fears that surging cases across the UK will lead to millions of people being asked to self-isolate during the summer, even if they have been fully vaccinated.

The requirement for double-jabbed people to isolate after contact with a positive case is due to end on 16 August, four weeks after the majority of England's Covid rules are set to end.

The prime minister said the 16 August date was chosen to “get even more vaccinations into people's arms, give ourselves even more protection”.

A total of 32,551 new coronavirus cases were announced on Thursday – up very slightly on Wednesday – as well as 35 more deaths.

Nearly 65% of the adult population in the UK have received two jabs, and 86% have had a first dose.

Have you been affected by the issues raised in this story? Share your experiences and views by emailing haveyoursay@bbc.co.uk.

Please include a contact number if you are willing to speak to a BBC journalist. You can also get in touch in the following ways:

If you are reading this page and can't see the form you will need to visit the mobile version of the BBC website to submit your question or comment or you can email us at HaveYourSay@bbc.co.uk. Please include your name, age and location with any submission.


... read more
– July 8, 2021
Amber list countries International travel from amber list countries and territories

Tags
Back to top button