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NHS covid vaccine NHS inviting people who are 44 to get Covid19 vaccine today


NHS covid vaccine NHS covid vaccine vaccine who get people today are Covid-19 to inviting 44 NHS

Mon, 26 Apr 2021 06:00:00 +0100

Since the vaccination rollout began in December, more than 28 million people have been vaccinated with a first dose in England, 63

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8 per cent of the total 

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If you are aged 44 you can now book your Covid-19 vaccine

IF YOU ARE 44-years-old you can get your Covid-19 vaccine from today.

The NHS is now inviting those in that age category to book their jab, as its vaccine programme continues at pace.

England’s top doctors and the Health Secretary are urging people to come forward for their vaccine when they are invited to do so.

Around half a million 44-year olds will receive a text inviting them to get their jab through the national booking service from today.

The move to the next age group comes alongside the latest figures showing that more than two thirds of people aged 45 to 49 had been vaccinated.

The decision to move to people aged 40-43 will be set out in the coming days with the NHS vaccinating in line with JCVI advice and as supply allows.

Since the vaccination rollout began in December, more than 28 million people have been vaccinated with a first dose in England, 63.8 per cent of the total population of adults aged over 18.

NHS staff have also carried out more than ten million second doses and is reminding people to attend their second dose to ensure they receive maximum protection.

NHS England chief executive, Sir Simon Stevens said: “Thanks to NHS staff, people aged 45-49 have been hot on the heels of millions of people most at risk who were quick to take up the offer of a vaccine with more than two thirds getting their lifesaving jab, marking another medically important milestone in the biggest vaccination campaign in NHS history.

“When the time comes, and you get that text, book an appointment to get your vaccine – it is the best protection you and your loved ones will receive from this deadly virus.”

NHS Medical Director, Professor Stephen Powis, said: “It is testament to the hard work of NHS staff that we are now able to vaccinate people in the next age group.

“If you are aged 44, when you are invited to do so, please do book your jab as appointments become available – it is simple, effective and provides vital protection against the coronavirus.”

Health and Social Care Secretary, Matt Hancock, said: “Now that 95 per cent of all over 50s have had their first jab, and more than two thirds of those aged 45-49, we are opening up vaccinations to 44 year olds.

“The biggest vaccination programme in NHS history has delivered 45.5 million doses so far across the UK, and we are on track to offer a jab to all adults by the end of July. 

“I encourage everyone who is 44 to book an appointment to get the jab – it will protect you and your loved ones, and help put this pandemic behind us.”

When invited, people will be able to book at a Vaccination Centre or pharmacy site across the country through the national booking service.

The NHS currently vaccinates using three vaccines, Pfizer, Moderna, and AstraZeneca, all of which have been approved as safe and effective by the world leading medical regulator the MHRA.

People who cannot go online can call the service on 119 instead to book their jab.

Text invitations appear as an alert from “NHSvaccine”, including a web link to the NHS website to reserve an appointment.

Vaccinations are now being administered at more than 1,600 sites across the country, including mosques, museums and rugby grounds, meaning the vast majority of the people live within 10 miles of at least one vaccination service.

The NHS made history when Maggie Keenan became the first person in the world to be protected against coronavirus outside of a clinical trial when she received the Pfizer vaccine at Coventry Hospital on December 8.

The NHS was also the first health system to deliver the new Oxford/AstraZeneca coronavirus vaccine when Brian Pinker, 82, received his on January 4.

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NHS covid vaccine

Mon, 26 Apr 2021 06:00:00 +0100

The media blitz will also remind people who have had a first vaccine dose to get their follow up jab when told

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The media blitz will also remind people who have had a first vaccine dose to get their follow up jab when told.

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The COVID vaccination programme is being expanded to younger age groups as the government launches a campaign to encourage people under the age of 50 to get the jab.

In England, 44-year-olds are next in line, with invitations sent out to around 500,000 people from today.

More than two-thirds of those aged 45 to 49 have already been vaccinated and the decision to move to people aged 40 to 43 will be set out in the coming days.

Since the vaccination rollout began in December, more than 28 million people have been vaccinated with a first dose in England, 63.8% of the total population of adults aged over 18.

In Northern Ireland, the vaccination will be fully open for those aged 35 to 39, following some limited availability for this age group last week.

The government campaign is a 60-second video, with a cover of Dinah Washington’s What A Difference A Day Makes recorded by songwriter and artist Shells, has been produced for the effort.

It shows people across the UK getting their COVID vaccines, as well as the healthcare workers who administer them.

The plan is for the advert to both encourage people under 50 to get a coronavirus shot, and also remind those who have already had a jab of the need to get their follow-up dose.

So far, 33,666,638 first vaccinations have been given out in the UK.

And with 12,587,116 second doses administered, a total of 46,253,754 jabs have been given out.

Health Secretary Matt Hancock said: “Vaccines are helping us get back to doing the things we have missed – they protect you and those around you.

“This campaign is a remarkable and poignant reminder of everything we’ve been through as a country and everything we have to look forward to – as well as the tireless efforts of our volunteers, NHS heroes and the British people.

“Every vaccination gives us hope and I urge everyone to take up the offer of a vaccine when it comes, as we continue on the path back to normality.”

The campaign – called “every vaccination gives us hope” – will also appear on radio, multicultural media, social media and billboards.

The TV advert will first be aired at 7.15pm on ITV on Monday, during Emmerdale.

It comes with vaccine hesitancy in the UK said to be highest in 16 to 29-year-olds, according to figures from the Office for National Statistics (ONS).

Some 12% of people in this age group said they had declined the vaccine, were unlikely to have the jab if offered, or did not know if they would have a vaccination in a survey carried out earlier this year.

This is the equivalent to roughly 1.2 million people, based on analysis of the figures by the ONS.

Hesitancy was 9% among those aged 30 to 49 – equivalent to 1.6 million people.

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The government says that since they and the NHS published the vaccine uptake plan in February, the take-up of jabs from people of all ethnic minority backgrounds has tripled.

Among people from a Pakistani background, uptake is four times higher than in February, and from those of Bangladeshi heritage, it is five times higher.

Meanwhile, researchers are recruiting 4,000 volunteers to take part in a study trialling a new coronavirus vaccine by Valneva.

Early trials have shown the vaccine to be “well tolerated with no safety concerns identified” and recruitment for the final phase of trials will begin at the end of April.

It will run across 22 sites in England and two in Scotland and is open to healthy adults who have not had previous COVID-19 vaccines.

– April 26, 2021
NHS covid vaccine NHS inviting people who are 44 to get Covid19 vaccine today