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St George’s Day St George39;s Day Six reasons why England39;s patron saint is a symbol

st george’s day, st george


St George’s Day St George’s Day George's Six Day: saint is symbol England's … St a why reasons patron

Fri, 23 Apr 2021 01:00:00 +0100

His background was about as multicultural as you can get

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Most historians think George was born in modern-day Turkey to a Greek family

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He served in the army of 

Thought George was just the patron saint of England? Think again

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Saint George has become a symbol of nationalism in England, but there are some good reasons to think his life represents the values of a more benign ideology: multiculturalism.

Most historians think George was born in modern-day Turkey to a Greek family. He served in the army of an Italian city-state and ultimately died living in modern-day Palestine. His parents, though Greek-speaking, were from Cappadocia in central Turkey and Palestine respectively.

Saint George’s heritage was about as multicultural as you could get in the classical world.

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George moved country looking for work, probably immigrating from Cappadocia to Palestine to be employed as a palace guard for the emperor Diocletian.

He moved between the provinces of the vast Roman empire in the way a skilled manual worker might travel between the member states of the EU to find better employment.

For centuries the Roman Empire had worshiped its native pagan gods. George came to fame because he spread his foreign, Middle Eastern, religion to western civilization.

He supposedly convinced Empress Alexandra of Rome to adopt the new, expanding religion – Christianity – which spread throughout the empire until it was officially adopted. Most of the empire’s European successor states are still Christian today.

Saint George isn’t just the patron saint of England: He’s the patron saint of Bulgaria, Palestine, Ethiopia, Greece and Lithuania.

He’s also arguably most significantly the patron saint of Georgia, where Saint George’s Day is celebrated twice a year. The country’s name in English was considered by medieval chroniclers to have derived from the saint’s name.

As a tribune in the Roman army, George was fighting for a Europe-wide super-state that famously let its inhabitants keep their local traditions.

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In the imperial capital of Rome there were Britons mixing with Greeks and people from Palestine and Gaul.

As long as loyalty was pledged the emperor, local religious and cultural customs could continue and were incorporated into the empire.

As an immigrant with a foreign religion, Saint George was at the receiving end of discrimination and persecution from the Roman authorities, who were becoming wary of Christianity’s growing power.

While working in his new home the saint was hit by a new law to crack down on Christian soldiers: he was to be arrested and kicked out of the army.

George objected and was imprisoned and tortured and ultimately executed for his foreign ways. He would have benefited greatly from a higher degree of tolerance and multiculturalism.

This article was originally published in April 2016

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Hi {{fullName}}

St George’s Day

Fri, 23 Apr 2021 01:00:00 +0100

Two pro-freedom parties have formed an alliance for the London mayoral election: I support them

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Two pro-freedom parties have formed an alliance for the London mayoral election: I support them

It feels highly appropriate that on this day, St George’s Day, a new patriotic alliance between Reform UK and the Reclaim Party is being announced. As the Mayor of London and London Assembly elections draw closer, Richard Tice’s Reform UK will endorse mayoral candidate Laurence Fox; in return, Fox’s Reclaim Party will back Reform UK’s candidates on the London Assembly list.

As the aims and objectives of the two men are so similar, this is the grown-up thing to do and I support it.

Nobody should be under any illusions about how tough the next few weeks will be for both new parties, however. Normal campaigning is simply not possible under Covid rules and there will be no armies of activists knocking on doors.

The rapid growth of postal voting and its direct encouragement by many London boroughs is a further problem. I have always had doubts about the integrity of any election in which postal voting is allowed. It is banned in France for a reason.

Regrettably, the sheer number of postal ballots in circulation means that a large chunk of the election will take place well before polling day on May 6. During the 2016 mayoral election, about a quarter of votes were cast by post. This time, that figure will probably rise to a third or more. The inbuilt advantage this gives to the existing parties is enormous.

I would urge everybody to hold their horses and consider some fundamental points of principle before voting. Basic freedoms are being eroded. State control is on the rise. Serious questions about the relationship between citizen and nation must be asked. While every other party follows the Government line of extreme caution, Fox and Tice make the anti-lockdown case very effectively.

With more than 33 million people having had at least one dose of the vaccine so far and the daily death toll currently below that of road accidents, they know that the continued semi-lockdown of London is an unnecessary disaster. In economic terms alone, the cost to the capital is thought to be £55 billion.

Those who will have to foot most of this growing bill do not work in the public sector. No, the entrepreneurial men and women running businesses will be called upon to open their wallets. How much bigger do we want this bill to be?

Furthermore, an estimated 4.6 million people missed out on hospital treatment in England in 2020 because of Covid. This suggests that more people will die in the years to come from medical neglect than from the virus. The cure really could be worse than the disease.

Then there is the matter of personal liberty. Ever since Magna Carta, the British have enjoyed greater freedoms under a common law system than nearly every other country in the world. Astonishingly, under a Conservative government led by a supposedly libertarian prime minister, this precious gift is disintegrating.

A Government-sponsored campaign of fear has opened the door to digital identity cards, known colloquially as vaccine passports. Personally, I do not want to live in a country where a state official can stop me in the street and demand to see my papers.

Our liberty is not to be taken lightly and it will require the commitment of people like Fox and Tice to guarantee it.

In my discussions with both of them, I have been assured that they are in this fight for the long-term. If they manage to make an impact in the run up to May 6, I believe they will win over the hearts and minds of many traditional Conservative voters. Equally, a well-articulated case for opening up London and elsewhere will attract considerable support from the Conservative backbenches in the House of Commons.

I am very surprised that the Conservative candidate for London mayor, Shaun Bailey, does not see this. I like Shaun and I think that he has good instincts, yet on the continued repressive control of Londoners he has not asked the key questions. Perhaps from today he can be pushed in the right direction.

With the big Brexit battle now over, the fight is about what kind of country people want to live in: a free nation or a semi-authoritarian regime? This debate needs to happen very quickly. I wish Laurence Fox and Richard Tice all the very best.

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– April 23, 2021
St George’s Day St George39;s Day Six reasons why England39;s patron saint is a symbol
st george’s day, st george