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Ever Given 2021 39;She39;s Free39;. Giant Container Ship Blocking Suez Canal Underway .

Ever Given 2021 39;She39;s Free39;. Giant Container Ship Blocking Suez Canal Underway .
ever given suez

Ever Given 2021 39;She39;s Free39;. Giant Container Ship Blocking Suez Canal Underway .

Ever Given Ever Given 'She's Blocking Container … Canal Giant Free': Underway Suez Ship

Mon, 29 Mar 2021 09:00:00 -0700

The Ever Given had been wedged at an angle across the Suez Canal since Tuesday, preventing other shipping vessels from traveling through the waterway

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The Ever Given container ship, operated by the Evergreen Marine Corp., sails through the Suez Canal after it was fully freed and floated on Friday.

Mohamed Shokry/dpa/picture alliance via Getty Images hide caption

The Ever Given container ship, operated by the Evergreen Marine Corp., sails through the Suez Canal after it was fully freed and floated on Friday.

A 1,300-foot, 220,000-ton container ship that has been blocking traffic in the Suez Canal for nearly a week is finally free and once again underway, onboard tracking sites and livestreamed video from the scene indicate.

عودة الملاحة في #قناة_السويس إلى نشاطها الطبيعي #السفينة_الجانحة #تحيا_مصر ❤️🇪🇬 pic.twitter.com/mgWX2djq6d

Monday afternoon local time, as tugboat horns blared in celebration for having freed the grounded ship, the Ever Given was seen slowly making its way in the canal.

Marinetraffic.com showed the vessel pointed north for the first time since last Tuesday, when in high winds and low visibility it became cross-ways in the canal and ran aground, shutting down all ship traffic in the vital waterway.

“She’s free,” an official involved in the salvage operation said, according to Reuters.

“We pulled it off!” Peter Berdowski, CEO of Boskalis, the salvage firm hired through SMIT Salvage to rescue the Ever Given and get commerce moving through the waterway again, said in a statement.

“I am excited to announce that our team of experts, working in close collaboration with the Suez Canal Authority, successfully refloated the Ever Given on 29 March at 15:05 hrs local time (9:05 a.m.

ET), thereby making free passage through the Suez Canal possible again,” he said.

By early afternoon ET, Ever Given was making about 10 knots (11.5 mph) as it headed into Great Bitter Lake, a wide stretch of water halfway between the north and south ends of the canal where the ship is to be inspected to make sure it didn’t sustain any serious damage either at the time of the initial grounding or during attempts to free it.

The Panama-flagged, Japanese-owned container ship, which is operated by Taiwan-based Evergreen Marine, was originally destined for Rotterdam, Netherlands.

However, it could be diverted to another port for repairs, if necessary.

The Ever Given is among the largest container ships currently in operation — at roughly twice as long as the canal is wide.

Aided by a high tide, a flotilla of tugboats wrenched the ship’s massive bow from the canal’s bank, where it became lodged on March 23.

Announcing the news on Facebook, Egypt’s president, Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi said: “Today, Egyptians have succeeded in ending the crisis of the delinquent ship on the Suez Canal despite the massive technical complexity surrounding this process on every side.

Returning things to normal course, in Egyptian hands, reassures the whole world of the path of its goods and needs passed by this axial artery.”

Osama Rabie, chairman of the Suez Canal Authority, announced early Monday that the stern of the Ever Given container ship had been moved about 335 feet from shore; it had been only a few yards from land.

In two separate failed attempts over the weekend, tugboats and dredgers tried to refloat the vessel, stacked high with containers, according to shipping authorities.

Evergreen Marine said Sunday that dredging efforts had removed more than 20,000 tons of sand and mud, which loosened the ship’s bow, and that the ship’s stern had “been cleared from the sand bank.”

A satellite image shows the container ship Ever Given stuck in the Suez Canal near Suez, Egypt.

Attempts to free the mammoth vessel stuck in Egypt’s Suez Canal paid off on Monday.

Planet Labs Inc./AP hide caption

A satellite image shows the container ship Ever Given stuck in the Suez Canal near Suez, Egypt.

Attempts to free the mammoth vessel stuck in Egypt’s Suez Canal paid off on Monday.

The successful effort to free the ship means at least 369 vessels backed up waiting to transit the canal, including dozens of container ships, bulk carriers, oil tankers and liquefied natural gas (LNG) or liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) vessels, can now move, Rabie said, according to Reuters.

He told Egyptian television earlier that the Canal Authority would “not waste one second” in moving the delayed ships through the waterway.

Rabie said it could take up to three days to clear the backlog of ships.

Maersk, the world’s largest container line, said the knock-on disruptions to global shipping could take weeks or months to unravel.

Freeing the ship from its spot on the Suez Canal will allow billions of dollars worth of cargo to resume transit and obviate the need for vessels to take a long and expensive detour around the tip of Africa to travel between Asia and Western ports.

A prolonged delay could have increased the cost of shipping, complicated manufacturing and ultimately driven up prices of goods, logistics experts previously told NPR.

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Ever Given Ever Given

Mon, 29 Mar 2021 09:00:00 -0700

This satellite photo from Planet Labs Inc

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shows the Ever Given cargo ship stuck in

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SUEZ, Egypt (AP) – Salvage teams on Monday set free a colossal container 

SUEZ, Egypt (AP) – Salvage teams on Monday set free a colossal container ship that has halted global trade through the Suez Canal, bringing an end to a crisis that for nearly a week had clogged one of the world’s most vital maritime arteries.

Helped by the peak of high tide, a flotilla of tugboats managed to wrench the bulbous bow of the skyscraper-sized Ever Given from the canal’s sandy bank, where it had been firmly lodged since last Tuesday.

After hauling the fully laden 220,000-ton vessel over the canal bank, the salvage team was pulling the vessel toward the Great Bitter Lake, a wide stretch of water halfway between the north and south end of the canal, where the ship will undergo technical inspection, canal authorities said.

Satellite data from MarineTraffic.com confirmed that the ship was moving away from the shoreline toward the center of the artery.

Video released by the Suez Canal Authority showed the Ever Given being escorted by the tugboats that helped free it, each sounding off their horns in jubilation after nearly a week of chaos.

“We pulled it off!” said Peter Berdowski, CEO of Boskalis, the salvage firm hired to extract the Ever Given, in a statement.

“I am excited to announce that our team of experts, working in close collaboration with the Suez Canal Authority, successfully refloated the Ever Given … thereby making free passage through the Suez Canal possible again.”

The obstruction has created a massive traffic jam in the vital passage, holding up $9 billion each day in global trade and straining supply chains already burdened by the coronavirus pandemic.

It remained unclear when traffic through the canal would return to normal.

At least 367 vessels, carrying everything from crude oil to cattle, have piled up on either end of the canal, waiting to pass.

Data firm Refinitiv estimated it could take more than 10 days to clear the backlog of ships.

Meanwhile, dozens of vessels have opted for the alternate route around the Cape of Good Hope at Africa’s southern tip — a

3,100-mile detour that adds some two weeks to journeys and costs ships hundreds of thousands of dollars in fuel and other costs.

The freeing of the vessel came after dredgers vacuumed up sand and mud from the vessel’s bow and 10 tugboats pushed and pulled the vessel for five days, managing to partially refloat it at dawn.

It wasn’t clear whether the Ever Given, a Panama-flagged, Japanese-owned ship hauling goods from Asia to Europe, would continue to its original destination of Rotterdam or if it would need to enter another port for repairs.

Ship operators did not offer a timeline for the reopening of the crucial canal, which carries over 10% of global trade, including 7% of the world’s oil.

Over 19,000 ships passed through last year, according to canal authorities.

Millions of barrels of oil and liquified natural gas flow through the artery from the Persian Gulf to Europe and North America.

Goods made in China — furniture, clothes, supermarket basics — bound for Europe also must go through the canal, or else take the detour around Africa.

The unprecedented shutdown had threatened to disrupt oil and gas shipments to Europe from the Middle East and raised fears of extended delays, goods shortages and rising costs for consumers.

The salvage operation successfully relied on tugs and dredgers alone, allowing authorities to avoid the far more complex and lengthy task of lightening the vessel by offloading its 20,000 containers.

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– March 29, 2021
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