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Alan Turing 2021 GCHQ releases its toughest puzzle ever in honour of codebreaker .

Alan Turing 2021 GCHQ releases its toughest puzzle ever in honour of codebreaker .

Alan Turing Alan Turing toughest ever honour codebreaker … puzzle GCHQ its releases in of

Thu, 25 Mar 2021 09:00:00 +0000

As Alan Turing becomes the face of the new £50 note, Cheltenham-based GCHQ releases its toughest ever puzzle in his honour

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Thursday 25 March 2021

GCHQ has created 12 increasingly difficult puzzles for its #TuringChallenge, to honour the great codebreaker becoming the face of the new £50 note.

In honour of the legendary codebreaker, Alan Turing, GCHQ is releasing its hardest ever puzzle.

Cheltenham-based GCHQ unveiled its #TuringChallenge on Thursday 25 March 2021, as the Bank of England revealed that Alan Turing would be the face of the new £50 note.

The challenge involves a string of 12 increasingly difficult puzzles, based on the new banknote itself and technical drawings from Alan Turing’s designs.

Budding codebreakers will have to solve 11 puzzles to reveal the final – and most challenging puzzle – 11 single words or names that form their very own Enigma code.

According to GCHQ, the challenge could take even an experienced puzzler seven hours to complete.

Alan Turing is known as the father of modern computing and was instrumental in cracking the German Naval Enigma code during World War II.

Alongside fellow codebreaker, Gordan Welchman, Turing helped to develop the first special-purpose cryptanalytic machine called ‘The Bombe’ at Bletchley Park – the wartime home of GCHQ.

With this and the incredible minds of Alan Turing and other codebreakers, they were able to crack the Enigma code and supply British forces with intelligence that helped them win the Second World War.

Alan Turing is also an important LGBTQ+ icon, as despite his scientific brilliance and huge contribution to the war effort, he was prosecuted for being gay in 1952 and sadly took his own life in 1954.

GCHQ director, Jeremy Fleming, said: ‘Alan Turing’s appearance on the £50 note is a landmark moment in our history.

Not only is it a celebration of his scientific genius which helped to shorten the war and influence the technology we still use today, it also confirms his status as one of the most iconic LGBTQ+ figures in the world.

‘Turing was embraced for his brilliance and shunned for being gay.

His legacy is a reminder of the value of embracing all aspects of diversity, but also the work we still need to do to become truly inclusive.

‘Our Turing Challenge, a set of 12 puzzles, has been put together by some of our intelligence staff, where problem solving and a diverse mix of minds are at the heart of our work to help protect the UK from increasingly complex threats.’

For more information, or to try your hand at the #TuringChallenge, visit gchq.gov.uk.

By Chloe Gorman


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Alan Turing Alan Turing

Thu, 25 Mar 2021 09:00:00 +0000

Mr Turing was a pioneer of modern computing and hugely instrumental in breaking the German Naval Enigma cipher in 1942, at Bletchley Park – GCHQ's wartime 

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New £50 note

GCHQ has created its toughest puzzle ever in honour of Alan Turing appearing on the new £50 note.

The Bank of England revealed the note’s design featuring the scientist and mathematician on Thursday, as GCHQ officials said their new treasure hunt involving 12 puzzles “might even have left him scratching his head”.

Mr Turing was a pioneer of modern computing and hugely instrumental in breaking the German Naval Enigma cipher in 1942, at Bletchley Park – GCHQ’s wartime home.

To mark Alan Turing being made the face of #TheNew50, we’re setting you our toughest ever puzzle – the #TuringChallenge!

Can you hunt down the answers to 12 puzzles hidden on the new note? 🕵️‍♀️

Get to work ⬇️ https://t.co/m191L9nAgc pic.twitter.com/pHFzlLTPjD

— GCHQ (@GCHQ) March 25, 2021

Director of the cyber and intelligence agency Jeremy Fleming described him becoming the first gay man to appear on a banknote as confirming his status as “one of the most iconic LGBT+ figures in the world”.

Mr Fleming said: “Alan Turing’s appearance on the £50 note is a landmark moment in our history.

“Not only is it a celebration of his scientific genius, which helped to shorten the war and influence the technology we still use today, it also confirms his status as one of the most iconic LGBT+ figures in the world.

“Turing was embraced for his brilliance and persecuted for being gay.

“His legacy is a reminder of the value of embracing all aspects of diversity, but also the work we still need to do to become truly inclusive.”

The puzzles are based on the unique design elements of the new banknote, such as the technical drawings for the British Bombe, the machine designed by Mr Turing to break Enigma-enciphered messages.

Mr Turing’s great-nephew, James Turing, described the puzzle as a “wonderful tribute” which his family would be attempting to complete themselves.

He told BBC Radio 4’s Today programme: “I think it’s a wonderful recognition, and a bit reminiscent of the famous crossword that they used for recruiting at Bletchley Park back in the day.

“So, a wonderful tribute and certainly something we’ll be having a go at shortly.”

Here’s one to get you started with the #TuringChallenge

Puzzle 5️⃣ looks tricky, but our advice is to take it one letter at a time 🤫 #TheNew50

Find the other puzzles ⬇️https://t.co/m191L9nAgc pic.twitter.com/X969Zk7IYs

— GCHQ (@GCHQ) March 25, 2021

GCHQ officials said the full challenge could take an experienced puzzler seven hours to complete.

Colin, a GCHQ analyst and its chief puzzler, said: “Alan Turing has inspired many recruits over the years to join GCHQ, eager to use their own problem-solving skills to help to keep the country safe.

“So it seemed only fitting to gather a mix of minds from across our missions to devise a seriously tough puzzle to honour his commemoration on the new £50 note.

“It might even have left him scratching his head – although we very much doubt it.”

Mr Turing joined the Government Code & Cypher School – GCHQ’s wartime name – in 1938 to help with the code-breaking effort during the Second World War, working alongside Gordon Welchman.

In January 1940, Mr Turing had a meeting in Paris with Polish counterparts, who gave him the insights he needed to design the Bombe.

The combination of the Bombe and the brilliant minds and perseverance of those working at Bletchley Park led to the breaking of Enigma.

In January 1952, Mr Turing was prosecuted for “indecency” over his relationship with another man in Manchester, and was given a choice between imprisonment and probation on condition of undergoing hormone treatment.

In 1954, Mr Turing took his own life.

The puzzles can be found at www.gchq.gov.uk/information/turing-challenge.

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– March 25, 2021
Alan Turing 2021 GCHQ releases its toughest puzzle ever in honour of codebreaker .

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