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Iceland volcano 2021 Eruption of easing and not affecting flights

Iceland volcano 2021 Eruption of  easing and not affecting flights

Iceland volcano Iceland volcano affecting and flights Eruption not of easing

Sat, 20 Mar 2021 09:00:00 +0000

The eruption is 'minor' and there were no signs of ash or dust that could disrupt aviation, according to the Icelandic Meteorological Office

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The volcano on the Reykjanes Peninsula in Iceland

The eruption of a long-dormant volcano in Iceland is easing and should not interfere with air travel, the Icelandic Meteorological Office said.

The fissure eruption began at around 8.45pm on Friday in the Geldinga Valley, about 20 miles south-west of the capital, Reykjavik, the Met Office said.

The eruption is “minor” and there were no signs of ash or dust that could disrupt aviation, the agency said.

“The more we see, the smaller this eruption gets,” geophysicist Pall Einarsson told The Associated Press after monitoring the volcano throughout the night.

This south-western corner of Iceland is the most heavily populated part of the country.

The Department of Emergency Management said it does not anticipate evacuations, unless levels of volcanic gases rise significantly.

Keflavik Airport, Iceland’s international air traffic hub, said flights have remained on schedule since the eruption began.

“There is no indication of production of ash and tephra, and there is no imminent hazard for aviation,” the Met Office said on its website.

In 2010, an eruption of the Eyjafjallajokull volcano in Iceland sent clouds of ash and dust into the atmosphere, interrupting air travel between Europe and North America because of concerns the material could damage jet engines.

More than 100,000 flights were grounded, stranding millions of passengers.

The Geldinga Valley eruption is the first on the Reykjanes Peninsula in almost 800 years.

The area began rumbling with increased seismic activity 15 months ago, and the tremors increased dramatically last month.

Over the past three weeks, the area has been rattled by about 50,000 small earthquakes, dozens of them magnitude 4 or stronger, the Met Office said.

Iceland, located above a volcanic hotspot in the North Atlantic, averages one eruption every four to five years.

The last one was at Holuhraun in 2014, when a fissure eruption spread lava the size of Manhattan over the interior highland region.

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Iceland volcano Iceland volcano

Sat, 20 Mar 2021 09:00:00 +0000

A volcano erupted near Iceland's capital Reykjavik on Friday, shooting lava high into the night sky after thousands of small earthquakes in recent weeks

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MercoPress, en Español

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MercoPress, en Español

Montevideo, March 20th 2021 – 17:30 UTC

 

 

A volcano erupted near Iceland's capital Reykjavik on Friday, shooting lava high into the night sky after thousands of small earthquakes in recent weeks.

The eruption occurred near Fagradalsfjall, a mountain on the Reykjanes Peninsula, around 30 km southwest of the capital.

Some four hours after the initial eruption at 2045 GMT – the first on the peninsula since the 12th century – lava covered about one square kilometer or nearly 200 football fields.

“I can see the glowing red sky from my window,” said Rannveig Gudmundsdottir, resident in the town of Grindavik, only 8 km from the eruption.

“Everyone here is getting into their cars to drive up there,” she said.

More than 40,000 earthquakes have occurred on the peninsula in the past four weeks, a huge jump from the 1,000-3,000 earthquakes registered each year since 2014.

The eruption posed no immediate danger to people in Grindavik or to critical infrastructure, according to the Icelandic Meteorological Office (IMO), which classified the eruption as small.

A fissure 500 to 750 meters long opened at the eruption site, spewing lava fountains up to 100 meters high, Bjarki Friis of the meteorological office said.

Residents in the town of Thorlakshofn, east of the eruption site, were told to stay indoors to avoid exposure to volcanic gases, Iceland’s Department of Civil Protection and Emergency Management said.

The wind was blowing from the west.

Unlike the eruption in 2010 of the Eyjafjallajökull volcano, which halted approximately 900,000 flights and forced hundreds of Icelanders from their homes, this eruption is not expected to spew much ash or smoke into the atmosphere.

Located between the Eurasian and the North American tectonic plates, among the largest on the planet, Iceland is a seismic and volcanic hot spot as the two plates move in opposite directions.

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– March 20, 2021
Iceland volcano 2021 Eruption of easing and not affecting flights

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